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ROYBI Robot

ROYBI Robot

ROYBI Robot

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What is ROYBI Robot?

Named by TIME Magazine as one of The Best Inventions of 2019, Roybi Robot provides children 3+ with a personalized education based on their individual learning pace and interests, setting the foundation for a successful future.

With over 500 lessons, including language learning, basic STEM, stories, games, and songs, Roybi Robot creates a fun and interactive learning experience for children.

Recommended Usage

Minimum 10 hours a week.

Screenshots

Age Range0-4, 5-7
PoliciesTerms of ServicePrivacy Policy
Requirements

Wi-Fi connection, tablet or phone to install the robot

ROYBI Robot Pricing


Pricing Plans
Not provided by vendor.

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Pedagogy

Certified by Education Alliance Finland

EAF Evaluation is an academically-backed approach to evaluating the pedagogical design of a product. EAF evaluators assess the product using criteria that covers the most essential pedagogical aspects in the learning experience.
Passive
Active
When interacting with Roybi, the robot aims to motivate learning with interactive tasks, by conversation, and with games where the child can press buttons to answer questions. Playing music and singing together is a nice feature and allow independent exploration. Roybi provides pre-curated material, and the parent/teacher can easily view the content from the app.
Rehearse
Construct
In Roybi, learning happens through exploration and observation. Roybi encourages interaction, which is a much more efficient way to learn than just passive observation alone. Learning is based on replicating instructions and repeating phrases the robot delivers, and the content is repeated enough to help to memorize things. The use of a camera and microphone to interact with a parent is a great idea and works smoothly.
Linear
Non-linear/Creative
The lessons follow a linear, predetermined user progression which forms a coherent story. Yet, a parent can easily choose what content the child is experiencing and also diviate from the suggested plan. If using Ryobi more independently, the child can explore interactions and change between lessons and songs. Therefore the learning progress is individual and the child can have very personal experience.
Individual
Collaborative
The child can act and progress autonomously. In classroom setting (or when using the robot with parent) the solution promotes the sharing of learning outcomes because all learning happens by discussion.

Learning goals

Certified by Education Alliance Finland

The supported learning goals are identified by mapping the product against the selected reference curriculum and soft skills definitions most relevant for the 21st century.

  • Can follow speech that is very slow and carefully articulated, with long pauses for him/her to assimilate meaning.
  • Can understand instructions addressed carefully and slowly to him/her and follow short, simple directions.
  • Can understand phrases and expressions related to areas of most immediate priority (e.g. very basic personal and family information, shopping, local geography, employment) provided speech is clearly and slowly articulated.
  • Can understand enough to be able to meet needs of a concrete type provided speech is clearly and slowly articulated.
  • Can interact in a simple way but communication is totally dependent on repetition at a slower rate of speech, rephrasing and repair. Can ask and answer simple questions, initiate and respond to simple statements in areas of immediate need or on very familiar topics.
  • Can understand everyday expressions aimed at the satisfaction of simple needs of a concrete type, delivered directly to him/her in clear, slow and repeated speech by a sympathetic speaker.
  • Can ask and answer simple questions, initiate and respond to simple statements in areas of immediate need or on very familiar topics.
  • Can ask and answer questions about themselves and other people, where they live, people they know, things they have.
  • Can describe him/herself, what he/she does and where he/she lives.
  • Student can understand when the teacher tells him/her to do something that he/she already knows.
  • Student Can understand instructions given by the teacher in the classroom, such as ‘You must do this’, ‘Take off your coats.’
  • Student can understand simple phrases and sentences concerning my family and my school.
  • Student understands when somebody talks about their family or friends in simple sentences.
  • Student can understand questions about oneself.
  • Student can understand when the teacher tells me to do something that he/she already knows.
  • Student can understand simple questions about oneself.
  • Student can understand the teacher’s instructions.
  • Student can understand questions about his/her name, age, and where he/she lives.
  • Student can n understand simple personal information ( e.g. name, age, place of residence, origin) when other people introduce themselves, provided that they speak slowly and clearly directly to him/her, and can understand questions on this theme addressed to him/her, though the questions may need to be repeated.
  • Student can have simple daily conversations on what he/she likes and dislikes.
  • Student can understand when he/she is asked personal questions: his/her name, age and where he/she lives.
  • Student can understand questions and instructions that the teacher says carefully and slowly to him/her. He/she can then answer the questions and follow the instructions.
  • Learning to listen other people’s opinions
  • Student can ask and answer simple, short questions about a free-time activity, e.g. I like to go to the cinema. What do you like to do the most?
  • Student can understand simple questions which directly concern him/her, for example about name, age and address, or similar things, if the person is asking slowly and clearly.
  • Student can understand when people greet him/her, ask him/her how he/she is and says good-bye to him/her. [
  • Student can understand simple instructions given by the teacher during the class (“Stand up”, “Sit down”, “Come in”, “Go out”, “Say”, “Listen”, “Give me the book”, “Take it”, etc.)
  • Student can understand common words and names of everyday objects that are in his/her everyday life.
  • Student can understand simple classroom instructions such as “Sit down”, “Wait”, “Listen”.
  • Student can understand routine phrases such as “please” and “thank you.”
  • Student can understand simple, short instructions given by my teacher, e.g. Stand up, please!
  • Student can understand when somebody is greeting him/her or says good-bye, e.g. Good morning, children!
  • Student can understand separate words frequently used in conversational phrases (e.g. greetings and farewell).
  • Practicing to take care of one's own wellbeing and health
  • Practicing to use foreign language as a communication tool
  • Learning to build information on top of previously learned
  • Practicing to recognize and express feelings
  • Student can ask his/her classmates simple, short questions, e.g. What is your favourite colour?
  • Practicing memorizing skills
  • Student can ask someone’s name, and say his/her name.
  • Student can recognise simple greetings.
  • Using technology to express one’s emotions and experiences
  • Practicing versatile ways of working
  • Student can talk about how he/she feels and also ask others how they feel in simple, short sentences, e.g. I am tired. How are you today?
  • Student can ask somebody about how they are and what they like doing and answer similar questions.
  • Student can understand some words and phrases he/she hears on TV programmes.
  • Student can understand everyday words and sentences in children’s films, cartoons, tales, advertisements and announcements.
  • Can recognise words, names and numbers that he/she already knows in simple, short recordings, provided that they are pronounced very slowly and clearly.
  • Student can understand the main point(s) from a short spoken passage, e.g. a short rhyme or song, a telephone message, announcement or weather forecast…
  • Student can understand simple classroom instructions such as “Sit down”, “Wait”, “Listen”.
  • Student can understand simple instructions given by the teacher during the class (“Stand up”, “Sit down”, “Come in”, “Go out”, “Say”, “Listen”, “Give me the book”, “Take it”, etc.)
  • Student can understand simple instructions (“Open your book!”, “Come to the board!”, “Stop!”, “Run!”, …)
  • Student can understand when my friends tell me how to play a game.
  • Student can understand when the teacher tells me to do something that I already know.
  • Student can understand the teacher’s instructions.
  • Student can understand instructions given by the teacher in the classroom, such as ‘You must do this’, ‘Take off your coats.’
  • Student can understand very short conversations when people speak slowly and clearly.
  • When people speak, student can understand common phrases and often used words on the topics he/she knows something about.
  • Student can understand a range of familiar spoken phrases, e.g. basic phrases concerning myself, my family and school…
  • Student can understand when somebody talks about their family or friends in simple sentences.
  • Student can introduce oneself, his/her family and his/her friends.
  • Student can greet and farewell in different time slices of a day.
  • Student can introduce somebody and can use basic greetings and leave taking expressions.
  • Student can introduce oneself and others in simple, short sentences, e.g. My name is Peter. I live in …
  • Student can greet somebody and say good-bye in simple and short sentences, e.g. Good bye, Mr Miller!
  • Student can introduce his/her friend: student can say his/her name, age, where he/she lives, what he/she likes to do.
  • Student can introduce oneself, say his/her name, and answer simple questions about oneself if people speak slowly and clearly (e.g. "What’s your name?" "How old are you?" "What grade are you in?", “How many brothers and sisters do you have?” etc.).
  • Student can greet and say goodbye to an adult or my friend using the correct words to match a certain time of the day (e.g., “Hello,” “Good morning,” “Good afternoon,” “Good evening,” “Goodbye,” “Have a nice trip,” “See you tomorrow,” etc.).
  • Student can identify familiar words and phrases.
  • Student can understand some words in songs and rhymes.
  • Student can recognise shapes and categories.
  • Student can say hello and goodbye to his/her teachers and classmates.
  • Student can understand some words and phrases in songs and simple children’s poems.
  • Student can can understand a few familiar spoken words and phrases, e.g. the teacher’s instructions, a few words and phrases in a song or a rhyme, days of the week, colours or numbers…
  • Student can understand the words for the main places in the town or village where he/she lives.
  • Student can understand when his/her friends tell him/her how to play a game.
  • When someone talks to the student clearly and slowly he/she can say his/her name, his/her age, where he/she lives, his/her birthday.
  • Learning to face respectfully people and follow the good manners
  • Student can greet and respond to a greeting.
  • Student can introduce oneself and other people.
  • Student can ask and answer questions about a person, family, and interests.
  • Student understands instructions given by the teacher in the classroom, such as ‘You must do this’, ‘Take off your coats.’
  • Student can ask someone if they have brothers or sisters. [
  • Student can ask and answer questions about a familiar story in simple, short sentences, e.g. questions about a story in a children’s book.
  • Student can interact with people if they speak slowly and repeat the words he/she doesn’t understand and then help him/her plan what he/she is trying to say.
  • Student can understand simple, short instructions given by my teacher, e.g. Stand up, please!
  • Student can ask someone what they like or don’t like.
  • Student can make and reply to simple requests.
  • Student can understand when somebody asks him/her for help using simple, short sentences, e.g. Can you help me, please?
  • Student can understand when someone tells me how he/she feels in simple, short sentences, e.g. Today I am fine.
  • Student can understand when somebody who is helping him/her tells him/her what to do.
  • Student can understand questions and instructions that the teacher says carefully and slowly to me. I can then answer the questions and follow the instructions.
  • Student can understand when somebody introduces his/her family or friends to me, e.g. This is my mother.
  • Student can understand when someone tells me how he/she feels in simple, short sentences, e.g. Today I am fine.
  • Student can understand when somebody asks me for help using simple, short sentences, e.g. Can you help me, please?
  • Student can understand very short conversations when people speak slowly and clearly.
  • Student can understand when someone speaks about a free-time activity in simple, short sentences, e.g. I like to read.
  • Student can answer questions about the colours I am wearing.
  • Encouraging the growth of positive self-image
  • Practicing to notice causal connections
  • Encouraging to build new information and visions
  • Learning to know and respect human rights
  • Learning to understand people, surroundings and phenomenons around us
  • Practicing communication through different channels
  • Learning to understand the meaning of rules, contracts and trust
  • Practicing to express own thoughts and feelings
  • Enabling the growth of positive self-image
  • Practicing decision making
  • Student can understand the names of some animals and plants.
  • Student can understand the names for people who work and live in my town or area.
  • Student can understand the words for people who help us.
  • Student can identify names of shops or places (chemist’s, baker’s, school, post office, football field, …)
  • Student can understand the important words in a song or rhyme.
  • Student can ask for something.
  • Student can work out and act out a simple and short role-play with others, e.g. a telephone conversation.
  • Student can understand when his/her conversation partner introduces himself when he/she says his/her name, age and where he/she lives.
  • Student can understand when somebody talks about his/her holidays using simple, short sentences, e.g. In the holidays I was in Italy.
  • Student can understand a range of familiar spoken phrases, e.g. basic phrases concerning myself, my family and school…
  • Student can understand when people ask him/her a simple question or ask for something when they speak slowly and clearly.
  • Student can understand familiar words and phrases (e.g. numbers, days of the week, colours, weather).
  • When people talk to the student slowly, he/she can understand the names of people, animals, objects, plants and flowers, parts of the body, food, clothes, days of the week, months of the year, seasons of the year, means of transport, holidays and festivities, jobs.
  • Student can ask and answer simple questions and talk about his/her interests, e.g. taking part in an interview about my area and interests; a survey about pets or favourite foods; talking with a friend about what we like to do and wear…
  • Student can ask and answer simple, short questions about pets, e.g. My hamster’s name is Hugo. What does your guinea pig eat?
  • Student can ask how someone is, and say how I am.
  • Student can say please and thank you.
  • Student can find colours, shapes and opposites in the classroom.
  • Student can understand instructions that include colours, shapes or opposites.
  • Student can ask someone to play a game with him/her, e.g. Will you play catch with me?
  • Student n ask questions and use fixed expressions such as ‘How much is/are…?’ , ‘What’s the matter?’, ‘I’m good at…’.
  • Student ask questions about school activities, for example classroom tasks, homework, holidays.
  • Student can answer simple questions about what he/she does on different days.
  • Student can give my name and address and the name of my school to a person who is helping me.
  • Student can answer some questions about where he/she lives.
  • Student can answer questions about where I have been in my area.
  • Student can ask and answer simple questions, such as “What is your name?” “How old are you?”, “Where do you live?”, “What do you like?”, etc..
  • Student can ask my friends where they live, people they know, things they have, and the like, and can answer such questions.
  • Learning to face failures and disappointments
  • Student can link words or groups of words with very basic linear connectors like 'and' or 'then'.
  • Student cCan communicate basic information about personal details and needs of a concrete type in a simple way.
  • Student can communicate very basic information about personal details in a simple way.
  • Student can manage very short, isolated, mainly pre-packaged utterances, with much pausing to search for expressions, to articulate less familiar words, and to repair communication.
  • Student can manage very short, isolated, rehearsed utterances using gesture and signalled requests for help when necessary.
  • Student can recognise internationalisms and words common to different languages (e.g. airport/aéroport/aeropuerto) to deduce the meaning of simple signs and notices.
  • Practicing logical reasoning to understand and interpret information in different forms
  • Using technology as a part of explorative and creative process
  • Learning to acquire, modify and produce information in different forms
  • Practicing to use information independently and interactively
  • Learning the basics of spelling
  • Using technology resources for problem solving
  • Using technology as a part of explorative and creative process
  • Using technology for interaction and collaboration
  • Using technology as a part of explorative process
  • Practicing fine motor skills
  • Practicing categorization and classification
  • Practicing to observe spoken and written language
  • Practising visual recognition
  • Learning to notice causal connections
  • Practicing persistent working
  • Practicing to find ways of working that are best for oneself
  • Learning to find the joy of learning and new challenges
  • Practicing to use imagination and to be innovative
  • Practicing to use imagination and to be innovative
  • Practicing to use arts as a way to express
  • Practicing to notice causal connections
  • Learning about different countries and their characteristics
  • Encouraging students to be innovative and express new ideas
  • Learning about cultural aspects and to respect different cultures
  • Practicing to take care of one's own and other people’s safety
  • Encouraging to build new information and visions
  • Supporting student to build their own linguistic and cultural identity
  • Student can borrow school material.
  • Student can tell the teacher if he/she needs something.
  • Student can ask for things in the classroom.
  • Student can ask his/her conversation partner to give him/her this or that thing and understand what he/she asks for.
  • Student can ask people for things, and give people things when he/she is asked to.
  • Understanding and practicing safe and responsible uses of technology
  • Student can ask for and can give things.
  • Student can ask for things in shops and ask how much they cost.
  • Student can say what he/she wants to buy in a store and, if necessary, make oneself better understood by using gestures and facial expressions.
  • Student can name some foods and drinks.
  • Student can ask for food and drinks and say thank you, e.g. Cake and juice, please!
  • Student can answer some questions about where his/her family came from.
  • Student can use numbers, quantity, prices and time, size (by resorting to mime if necessary).
  • Student can make simple purchases through pointing to objects or using gestures.
  • Student can ask for directions and give directions in simple, short sentences, e.g. How do I get to the train station?
  • Practicing to notice links between subjects learned
  • Student can ask somebody for help if he/she is worried or lost.
  • Learning about different languages
  • Student can answer simple questions about the weather.
  • Using technology for interaction and collaboration (also internationally)
  • Student can answer questions about keeping a pet.
  • Student can ask about the weather and talk about it, e.g. What is the weather like today?
  • Student can ask and explain where someone or something can be found in simple, short sentences, e.g. Where is the blue ball?
  • Getting familiar with different cultures
  • Student can exchange ideas on numbers, quantities, costs, clock times, days, months and years.
  • Recognizing habits that are good for sustainable living
  • Practicing letters, alphabets and written language
  • Learning to combine information to find new innovations
  • Developing problem solving skills
  • Learning to find solutions in social conflicts
  • Student can indicate the month, day, and time (next week, last Friday, in November, at three o’clock).
  • Learning to recognise and evaluate arguments and their reasonings
  • Student can ask and answer questions about the date and the time, e.g. Today is Tuesday, 3rd June 2011. What’s the time, please?
  • Student can ask for permission (to leave the classroom, to go to the toilet, to speak in the classroom)
  • Student can ask his/her teacher for something and say thank you, e.g. May I open the door?
  • Supporting the growth of environmental awareness
  • Practicing to create questions and make justifiable arguments based on observations
  • Practicing to look things from different perspectives
  • Student can understand clock times, days, months and dates.
  • Practicing to take responsibility of one's own learning
  • Student can recognise differing ways of numbering, measuring g distance, telling the time, etc. even though he/she may have difficulty applying this in even simple everyday transactions of a concrete type.
  • Practicing to set one's own learning goals
  • Student can use a very limited repertoire in different languages to conduct a very basic, concrete, everyday transaction with a collaborative interlocutor.
  • Practicing to evaluate one's own learning
  • Experiencing and exploring sounds and music from different sources
  • Understanding concepts of music and familiarizing with different notations
  • Practicing to take care of own and other people’s safety
  • Creating requirements for creative thinking
  • Practising to understand visual concepts and shapes and observe their qualities
  • Learning to understand and interpret diverse types of texts
  • Practicing creative thinking
  • Student can understand the days of the week, months of the year and seasons in a spoken text, e.g. Monday, January, Spring.
  • Student can understand when someone says what time it is, e.g. It is half past four.
  • Student can understand numbers and prices.
  • Student can understand clock times, days, months and dates.
  • Student can understand when someone says the price of an object, e.g. The book costs 10 €.
  • Student can understand numbers, prices and the time.
  • Student can understand when he/she is told the time.
  • Student can understand simple questions about oneself, his/her family and his/her surroundings, when people speak slowly and clearly.
  • Student can arrange to meet someone. Shall we meet at the swimming pool at 11 o’clock?
  • Student can count to 20.
  • Student can understand days of the week and months of the year.
  • Student can ask where someone lives, and say where I live.
  • Student can understand the words for colours and shapes.
  • Practicing to find, evaluate and share information
  • Learning to view and consider media and advertising critically
  • Student can understand the words for different types of weather.
  • Student can understand the main words about travelling.
  • Student can understand the words for the holidays and festivals during the school year.
  • Student can recognise the names of other countries in the world.
  • Student can understand some geographical names.
  • Student can understand when he/she is told the time.
  • Student can can understand the days of the week.
  • Student can understand numbers, prices and the time.
  • Student can understand days of the week and months of the year.
  • Student can understand the names of clothes he/she wears to school and the food that he/she eats in school.
  • Student can understand when someone says what time it is, e.g. It is half past four.
  • Student can understand the days of the week, months of the year and seasons in a spoken text, e.g. Monday, January, Spring.
  • Student can understand when someone says the price of an object, e.g. The book costs 10 €.
  • Student can understand numbers and prices.
  • Familiarizing with the influences of media and understanding its affordances
  • Connecting subjects learned at school to skills needed at working life
  • Practicing to improvise
  • Student can apologise. He/she can say thank you.
  • Student can apologize and thank someone.
  • Student can give thanks and excuses by using simple sentences such as ́Thank you ́, ́Excuse me ́, ́Sorry ́,etc.
  • Practicing time management
  • Encouraging positive attitude towards working life
  • Student can agree or disagree with someone, using phrases such as ‘I think so’, ‘You are right’, ‘I don’t think so’.
  • Student can say what food and clothes he/she likes and doesn’t like.
  • Practicing to give, get and reflect feedback
  • Learning decision-making, influencing and accountability
  • Practicing to argument clearly own opinions and reasonings
  • Practicing to work with others
ROYBI Robot Categories
#9 in Robotics
#63 in Computing
Last updated 2nd July 2022
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