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ROYBI Robot

ROYBI Robot

ROYBI Robot

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What is ROYBI Robot?

Named by TIME Magazine as one of The Best Inventions of 2019, Roybi Robot provides children 3+ with a personalized education based on their individual learning pace and interests, setting the foundation for a successful future.

With over 500 lessons, including language learning, basic STEM, stories, games, and songs, Roybi Robot creates a fun and interactive learning experience for children.

Recommended Usage

Minimum 10 hours a week.
Age Range0-4, 5-7
PoliciesTerms of ServicePrivacy Policy
Requirements

Wi-Fi connection, tablet or phone to install the robot

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ROYBI Robot Pricing


Pricing Plans
Not provided by vendor.
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Pedagogy

Certified Pedagogical Quality

Certified by Education Alliance Finland, 12/2020

EAF Evaluation is an academically-backed approach to evaluating the pedagogical design of a product. EAF evaluators assess the product using criteria that covers the most essential pedagogical aspects in the learning experience.
Passive
Active
When interacting with Roybi, the robot aims to motivate learning with interactive tasks, by conversation, and with games where the child can press buttons to answer questions. Playing music and singing together is a nice feature and allow independent exploration. Roybi provides pre-curated material, and the parent/teacher can easily view the content from the app.
Rehearse
Construct
In Roybi, learning happens through exploration and observation. Roybi encourages interaction, which is a much more efficient way to learn than just passive observation alone. Learning is based on replicating instructions and repeating phrases the robot delivers, and the content is repeated enough to help to memorize things. The use of a camera and microphone to interact with a parent is a great idea and works smoothly.
Linear
Non-linear/Creative
The lessons follow a linear, predetermined user progression which forms a coherent story. Yet, a parent can easily choose what content the child is experiencing and also diviate from the suggested plan. If using Ryobi more independently, the child can explore interactions and change between lessons and songs. Therefore the learning progress is individual and the child can have very personal experience.
Individual
Collaborative
The child can act and progress autonomously. In classroom setting (or when using the robot with parent) the solution promotes the sharing of learning outcomes because all learning happens by discussion.

Learning goals

Certified by Education Alliance Finland

The supported learning goals are identified by mapping the product against the selected reference curriculum and soft skills definitions most relevant for the 21st century.

  • Can describe him/herself, what he/she does and where he/she lives.
  • Can ask and answer questions about themselves and other people, where they live, people they know, things they have.
  • Can ask and answer simple questions, initiate and respond to simple statements in areas of immediate need or on very familiar topics.
  • Can understand everyday expressions aimed at the satisfaction of simple needs of a concrete type, delivered directly to him/her in clear, slow and repeated speech by a sympathetic speaker.
  • Can interact in a simple way but communication is totally dependent on repetition at a slower rate of speech, rephrasing and repair. Can ask and answer simple questions, initiate and respond to simple statements in areas of immediate need or on very familiar topics.
  • Can understand enough to be able to meet needs of a concrete type provided speech is clearly and slowly articulated.
  • Can understand phrases and expressions related to areas of most immediate priority (e.g. very basic personal and family information, shopping, local geography, employment) provided speech is clearly and slowly articulated.
  • Can understand instructions addressed carefully and slowly to him/her and follow short, simple directions.
  • Can follow speech that is very slow and carefully articulated, with long pauses for him/her to assimilate meaning.
  • Student can understand very short conversations when people speak slowly and clearly.
  • Student can understand simple, short instructions given by my teacher, e.g. Stand up, please!
  • Student can understand when somebody is greeting him/her or says good-bye, e.g. Good morning, children!
  • Student can understand separate words frequently used in conversational phrases (e.g. greetings and farewell).
  • Student can understand routine phrases such as “please” and “thank you.”
  • Student can understand simple classroom instructions such as “Sit down”, “Wait”, “Listen”.
  • Student can make and reply to simple requests.
  • Student can understand when somebody who is helping him/her tells him/her what to do.
  • Can recognise words, names and numbers that he/she already knows in simple, short recordings, provided that they are pronounced very slowly and clearly.
  • Student can understand questions and instructions that the teacher says carefully and slowly to me. I can then answer the questions and follow the instructions.
  • Student can understand the main point(s) from a short spoken passage, e.g. a short rhyme or song, a telephone message, announcement or weather forecast…
  • Student can understand when the teacher tells him/her to do something that he/she already knows.
  • Student Can understand instructions given by the teacher in the classroom, such as ‘You must do this’, ‘Take off your coats.’
  • Student can have simple daily conversations on what he/she likes and dislikes.
  • Student can ask and answer simple, short questions about a free-time activity, e.g. I like to go to the cinema. What do you like to do the most?
  • Student can ask his/her classmates simple, short questions, e.g. What is your favourite colour?
  • Student can understand simple questions which directly concern him/her, for example about name, age and address, or similar things, if the person is asking slowly and clearly.
  • Student can n understand simple personal information ( e.g. name, age, place of residence, origin) when other people introduce themselves, provided that they speak slowly and clearly directly to him/her, and can understand questions on this theme addressed to him/her, though the questions may need to be repeated.
  • Student can ask someone’s name, and say his/her name.
  • Student can recognise simple greetings.
  • Student can understand when someone tells me how he/she feels in simple, short sentences, e.g. Today I am fine.
  • Student can understand when somebody asks him/her for help using simple, short sentences, e.g. Can you help me, please?
  • Student can ask someone what they like or don’t like.
  • Student can understand simple classroom instructions such as “Sit down”, “Wait”, “Listen”.
  • Student can talk about how he/she feels and also ask others how they feel in simple, short sentences, e.g. I am tired. How are you today?
  • When people speak, student can understand common phrases and often used words on the topics he/she knows something about.
  • Student can ask somebody about how they are and what they like doing and answer similar questions.
  • Student can introduce oneself, his/her family and his/her friends.
  • Student can greet and farewell in different time slices of a day.
  • Student can introduce somebody and can use basic greetings and leave taking expressions.
  • Student can introduce oneself and others in simple, short sentences, e.g. My name is Peter. I live in …
  • Student can greet somebody and say good-bye in simple and short sentences, e.g. Good bye, Mr Miller!
  • Student can introduce his/her friend: student can say his/her name, age, where he/she lives, what he/she likes to do.
  • Student can introduce oneself, say his/her name, and answer simple questions about oneself if people speak slowly and clearly (e.g. "What’s your name?" "How old are you?" "What grade are you in?", “How many brothers and sisters do you have?” etc.).
  • Student can greet and say goodbye to an adult or my friend using the correct words to match a certain time of the day (e.g., “Hello,” “Good morning,” “Good afternoon,” “Good evening,” “Goodbye,” “Have a nice trip,” “See you tomorrow,” etc.).
  • Student can say hello and goodbye to his/her teachers and classmates.
  • When someone talks to the student clearly and slowly he/she can say his/her name, his/her age, where he/she lives, his/her birthday.
  • Student can greet and respond to a greeting.
  • Student can introduce oneself and other people.
  • Student can ask and answer questions about a person, family, and interests.
  • Student can understand a range of familiar spoken phrases, e.g. basic phrases concerning myself, my family and school…
  • Student can understand when somebody talks about their family or friends in simple sentences.
  • Student can ask someone if they have brothers or sisters. [
  • Student can understand simple instructions given by the teacher during the class (“Stand up”, “Sit down”, “Come in”, “Go out”, “Say”, “Listen”, “Give me the book”, “Take it”, etc.)
  • Student can identify familiar words and phrases.
  • Student can understand some words in songs and rhymes.
  • Learning to face respectfully people and follow the good manners
  • Student can understand simple instructions (“Open your book!”, “Come to the board!”, “Stop!”, “Run!”, …)
  • Student can recognise shapes and categories.
  • Student can understand some words and phrases in songs and simple children’s poems.
  • Student can understand when my friends tell me how to play a game.
  • Student can can understand a few familiar spoken words and phrases, e.g. the teacher’s instructions, a few words and phrases in a song or a rhyme, days of the week, colours or numbers…
  • Student can understand when the teacher tells me to do something that I already know.
  • Student can understand the words for the main places in the town or village where he/she lives.
  • Learning to listen other people’s opinions
  • Practicing to use foreign language as a communication tool
  • Practicing to recognize and express feelings
  • Practicing versatile ways of working
  • Student can understand some words and phrases he/she hears on TV programmes.
  • Student can understand simple, short instructions given by my teacher, e.g. Stand up, please!
  • Student can understand when somebody introduces his/her family or friends to me, e.g. This is my mother.
  • Student can understand when someone tells me how he/she feels in simple, short sentences, e.g. Today I am fine.
  • Practicing to take care of one's own wellbeing and health
  • Student can understand when somebody asks me for help using simple, short sentences, e.g. Can you help me, please?
  • Student can understand everyday words and sentences in children’s films, cartoons, tales, advertisements and announcements.
  • Learning to build information on top of previously learned
  • Practicing memorizing skills
  • Student can understand the teacher’s instructions.
  • Student can understand when his/her friends tell him/her how to play a game.
  • Student can understand very short conversations when people speak slowly and clearly.
  • Student can ask and answer questions about a familiar story in simple, short sentences, e.g. questions about a story in a children’s book.
  • Student can understand when someone speaks about a free-time activity in simple, short sentences, e.g. I like to read.
  • Student can understand simple phrases and sentences concerning my family and my school.
  • Student understands when somebody talks about their family or friends in simple sentences.
  • Student can understand instructions given by the teacher in the classroom, such as ‘You must do this’, ‘Take off your coats.’
  • Student can understand questions about oneself.
  • Student can interact with people if they speak slowly and repeat the words he/she doesn’t understand and then help him/her plan what he/she is trying to say.
  • Student can understand when the teacher tells me to do something that he/she already knows.
  • Using technology to express one’s emotions and experiences
  • Student can understand simple questions about oneself.
  • Student can understand the teacher’s instructions.
  • Student can understand questions about his/her name, age, and where he/she lives.
  • Student understands instructions given by the teacher in the classroom, such as ‘You must do this’, ‘Take off your coats.’
  • Student can understand when he/she is asked personal questions: his/her name, age and where he/she lives.
  • Student can understand questions and instructions that the teacher says carefully and slowly to him/her. He/she can then answer the questions and follow the instructions.
  • Student can understand when people greet him/her, ask him/her how he/she is and says good-bye to him/her. [
  • Student can understand simple instructions given by the teacher during the class (“Stand up”, “Sit down”, “Come in”, “Go out”, “Say”, “Listen”, “Give me the book”, “Take it”, etc.)
  • Student can understand common words and names of everyday objects that are in his/her everyday life.
  • Practising visual recognition
  • Can recognise words, names and numbers that he/she already knows in simple, short recordings, provided that they are pronounced very slowly and clearly.
  • Student can talk about how he/she feels and also ask others how they feel in simple, short sentences, e.g. I am tired. How are you today?
  • Practicing to observe spoken and written language
  • Student can understand the words for colours and shapes.
  • Student can identify names of shops or places (chemist’s, baker’s, school, post office, football field, …)
  • Practicing memorizing skills
  • Student can understand when somebody talks about their family or friends in simple sentences.
  • Student can understand the names of some animals and plants.
  • Student can understand when somebody introduces his/her family or friends to me, e.g. This is my mother.
  • Student can can understand a few familiar spoken words and phrases, e.g. the teacher’s instructions, a few words and phrases in a song or a rhyme, days of the week, colours or numbers…
  • Student can understand some words and phrases in songs and simple children’s poems.
  • Student can understand some words in songs and rhymes.
  • Student can identify familiar words and phrases.
  • Student can understand simple questions about oneself.
  • Student understands when somebody talks about their family or friends in simple sentences.
  • Practicing persistent working
  • Student can understand the words for the main places in the town or village where he/she lives.
  • Learning to build information on top of previously learned
  • Student can understand when someone tells me how he/she feels in simple, short sentences, e.g. Today I am fine.

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Last updated 4th March 2024
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