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ThinkCERCA

ThinkCERCA

ThinkCERCA

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What is ThinkCERCA?

ThinkCERCA is a product for practicing literacy, multimodal literacy and critical thinking skills. The product offers a large variety of different texts from different subjects for students to read, write about and analyze.

With the CERCA method, it is easy for students to work with a given text and task to create the answer. Teachers can monitor the students’ progression in real time.

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Age Range5-7, 8-10, 11-13, 14-16, 17-18
LanguagesEnglish, Spanish

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Pedagogy

Certified Pedagogical Quality

Certified by Education Alliance Finland, 01/2018

EAF Evaluation is an academically-backed approach to evaluating the pedagogical design of a product. EAF evaluators assess the product using criteria that covers the most essential pedagogical aspects in the learning experience.
Passive
Active
Users are guided to be active while working with a new task. ThinkCERCA provides multiple ways to observe the text before giving the final answers to the assignment.
Rehearse
Construct
In more advanced tasks, ThinkCERCA guides students to build their own texts. The product offers an easy and interesting way to rehearse literacy and reading comprehension skills.
Linear
Non-linear/Creative
ThinkCERCA offers a structure for doing the assignments, but students are able to go back and forth as they like.
Individual
Collaborative
All of the tasks are mainly to be done individually.

Learning goals

Certified by Education Alliance Finland

The supported learning goals are identified by mapping the product against the selected reference curriculum and soft skills definitions most relevant for the 21st century.

  • Encouraging to build new information and visions
  • Plan their writing by identifying the audience for and purpose of the writing, selecting the appropriate form and using other similar writing as models for their own.
  • Draft and write in non-narrative material, using simple organisational devices [for example, headings and sub-headings].
  • Draft and write by organising paragraphs around a theme.
  • Plan their writing by discussing and recording ideas.
  • Make simple additions, revisions and corrections to their own writing by evaluating their writing with the teacher and other pupils.
  • Writing down ideas and/or key words, including new vocabulary.
  • Writing for different purposes.
  • Writing narratives about personal experiences and those of others (real and fictional).
  • Explain and discuss their understanding of what they have read, including through Formal presentations and debates, maintaining a focus on the topic and using notes where necessary.
  • Provide reasoned justifications for their views.
  • Distinguish between statements of fact and opinion.
  • Retrieve, record and present information from non-fiction.
  • Identifying how language, structure and presentation contribute to meaning.
  • Summarising the main ideas drawn from more than one paragraph, identifying key details that support the main ideas.
  • Retrieve and record information from non-fiction.
  • Identifying how language, structure, and presentation contribute to meaning.
  • Identifying main ideas drawn from more than one paragraph and summarising these.
  • Discussing and clarifying the meanings of words, linking new meanings to known vocabulary.
  • Explain clearly their understanding of what is read to them.
  • Discussing word meanings, linking new meanings to those already known.
  • Being encouraged to link what they read or hear read to their own experiences.
  • Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from the information or explanation presented.
  • Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3 above.)
  • Introduce a topic; organize ideas, concepts, and information, using strategies such as definition, classification, comparison/contrast, and cause/effect; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., charts, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
  • Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.
  • Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from the argument presented.
  • Use words, phrases, and clauses to clarify the relationships among claim(s) and reasons.
  • Support claim(s) with clear reasons and relevant evidence, using credible sources and demonstrating an understanding of the topic or text.
  • Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence.
  • Introduce claim(s) and organize the reasons and evidence clearly.
  • Determine an author's point of view or purpose in a text and explain how it is conveyed in the text.
  • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings.
  • Determine a central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments.
  • Read and comprehend literature proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.
  • Explain how an author develops the point of view of the narrator or speaker in a text.
  • Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and explain how it is conveyed in the text.
  • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative meanings.
  • Analyze in detail how a key individual, event, or idea is introduced, illustrated, and elaborated in a text.
  • Provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments.
  • Determine a theme or central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details.
  • Consult reference materials to find the pronunciation and determine the meaning of key words and phrases.
  • Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases.
  • Use context as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
  • Summarize or paraphrase information in notes and finished work, and provide a list of sources.
  • With guidance develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, editing or trying a new approach.
  • Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
  • Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or explanation presented.
  • Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.
  • Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information.
  • Read grade-level text with purpose and understanding.
  • Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.
  • Read and comprehend informational texts independently and proficiently.
  • Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text.
  • Describe how a narrator’s or speaker’s point of view influences how events are described.
  • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language.
  • Explain the relationships or interactions between two or more individuals, events, idea, or in technical text.
  • Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
  • Consult reference materials to find the pronunciation and determine the precise meaning of key words and phrases.
  • Choose words and phrases to convey ideas precisely.
  • Take notes and categorize information, and provide a list of sources.
  • Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
  • Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or explanation presented.
  • Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.
  • Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.
  • Provide a concluding statement or section related to the opinion presented.
  • Link opinion and reasons using words and phrases.
  • Provide reasons that are supported by facts and details.
  • Introduce a topic or text clearly and create an organizational structure in which related ideas are grouped to support the writer’s purpose.
  • Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information.
  • Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary.
  • Read grade-level text with purpose and understanding.
  • Read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.
  • Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.
  • Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text.
  • Describe the overall structure of events, ideas, concepts, or information in a text or part of a text.
  • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including those referring to characters of mythology.
  • Explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text.
  • Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
  • Distinguish the literal and nonliteral meanings of words and phrases in context.
  • Use sentence-level context as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
  • With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, and editing.
  • Produce writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task and purpose.
  • Use temporal words and phrases to signal event order.
  • Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.
  • Provide a concluding statement or section.
  • Use linking words and phrases to connect opinion and reasons.
  • Provide reasons that support the opinion.
  • Introduce the topic or text they are writing about, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure that lists reasons.
  • Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons.
  • Use context to confirm or self-correct word recognition and understanding, rereading as necessary.
  • Read grade-level text with purpose and understanding.
  • Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.
  • Describe the logical connection between particular sentences and paragraphs in a text.
  • Distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters.
  • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, distinguishing literal from nonliteral language.
  • Determine the central message, lesson, or moral of a text.
  • Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain how they support the main idea.
  • Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.
  • Use sentence-level context as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
  • Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases.
  • Produce, expand, and rearrange complete simple and compound sentences.
  • Produce complete sentences when appropriate to task and situation in order to provide requested detail or clarification.
  • Recount or describe key ideas or details from a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media.
  • With guidance and support from adults and peers, focus on a topic and strengthen writing as needed by revising and editing.
  • Write informative/explanatory texts in which they introduce a topic and use facts and definitions to develop points.
  • Write opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic or book they are writing about and state an opinion.
  • Read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts.
  • Describe how reasons support specific points the author makes in a text.
  • Identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author wants to answer, explain, or describe.
  • Know and use various text features to locate key facts or information in a text efficiently.
  • Determine the meaning of words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 2 topic or subject area.
  • Describe the connection between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts.
  • Identify the main topic of a multiparagraph text as well as the focus of specific paragraphs within the text.
  • Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why.
  • Interpret figures of speech (e.g., hyperbole, paradox) in context and analyze their role in the text.
  • Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.
  • Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word's position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
  • Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
  • Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.
  • Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
  • Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
  • Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented.
  • Introduce precise, knowledgeable claim(s), establish the significance of the claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that logically sequences claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
  • Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.
  • Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the structure an author uses in his or her exposition or argument, including whether the structure makes points clear, convincing, and engaging.
  • Analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how specific individuals, ideas, or events interact and develop over the course of the text.
  • Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • Analyze a case in which grasping a point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant (e.g., satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement).
  • Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)
  • Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
  • Identify real-life connections between words and their use.
  • Use sentence-level context as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
  • Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
  • Produce complete sentences when appropriate to task and situation.
  • Ask and answer questions about key details in a text read aloud or information presented orally.
  • With guidance and support from adults, recall information from experiences or gather information.
  • With guidance and support from adults, use a variety of digital tools to produce and publish writing.
  • Write informative/explanatory texts in which they name a topic, supply some facts about the topic, and provide some sense of closure.
  • Write opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic or name the book they are writing.
  • Read grade-level text orally with accuracy, appropriate rate, and expression on successive readings.
  • Recognize and read grade-appropriate irregularly spelled words.
  • Read grade-level text with purpose and understanding.
  • Read with sufficient accuracy and fluency to support comprehension.
  • Recognize the distinguishing features of a sentence.
  • Identify the reasons an author gives to support points in a text.
  • Distinguish between information provided by pictures or other illustrations and information provided by the words in a text.
  • Know and use various text features to locate key facts or information in a text.
  • Ask and answer questions to help determine or clarify the meaning of words and phrases in a text.
  • Describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in a text.
  • Identify the main topic and retell key details of a text.
  • Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • Learning to process spoken and written information
  • Practicing listening skills and textual comprehension
  • Understanding written assignments
  • Learning to construe/process texts and written content
  • Designing and producing own written content and textual representations
  • Practicing to look things from different perspectives
  • Practicing to create questions and make justifiable arguments based on observations
  • Developing problem solving skills
  • Learning to recognise and evaluate arguments and their reasonings
  • Learning to plan and organize work processes
  • Practicing decision making
  • Practicing versatile ways of working
  • Practicing to notice causal connections
  • Practicing to notice links between subjects learned
  • Learning to combine information to find new innovations
  • Plan their writing by noting and developing initial ideas, drawing on reading and research where necessary.
  • Practicing to find ways of working that are best for oneself
  • Practicing to find, evaluate and share information
  • Learning to plan and design own written content and textual representations
  • Practicing logical reasoning to understand and interpret information in different forms
  • Practising to understand visual concepts and shapes and observe their qualities
  • Learning to acquire, modify and produce information in different forms
  • Learning to understand and interpret diverse types of texts, from vernacular to academic
  • Understanding and interpreting of matrices and diagrams
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Last updated 3rd February 2023
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