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Robo Wunderkind

Robo Wunderkind

4.9/5

Robo Wunderkind

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What is Robo Wunderkind?

Robo Wunderkind - the complete STEM education toolkit for your classroom.

Robo Wunderkind is an award-winning solution for learning and teaching coding and robotics, which enables children to learn the essential STEM skills from the age of 5. Build robots with LEGO®-compatible colour-coded blocks, then learn to program and control them with an intuitive app, while the 80+ hours of cross-disciplinary learning materials make it easy for the teacher!


The award-winning robotics kits help children to promote their mental and physical development by getting to know the world around them through interacting with robotics and programming. Using colour-coded building blocks, children ages 5-14 can build their own robots and devices that can solve real-life problems. Using the intuitive Robo Wunderkind App, students can bring the robots to life by programming or remote controlling them.

Coding education for all skill levels

Our free Robo Wunderkind App offers learning opportunities for children of different ages and skill levels. It guides them from the basics all the way to complex coding concepts, using in-app tutorials across 3 levels.

- 3 coding levels: Matching experiences for ages 5-14. No previous knowledge needed!

- Learn block-based programming: with our Scratch-based programming interface called Blockly, children can bring their coding skills to the next level.

- Hands-on coding: children learn by doing and receive immediate feedback, which motivates them to keep exploring.

- In-app tutorials and open coding interface: from guided projects to creating code from scratch, the possibilities are endless!

- Available in German and English: more languages are on the way!


Where Robo Wunderkind is used

- Kindergartens

- Primary Schools

- Middle Schools

- Secondary Schools

- After-school activities

- Summer camps

- Coding clubs and makerspaces

- Anywhere where kids learn

Educational Impact

increase student collaboration
100%
build student knowledge
85%
improve teacher knowledge
85%
improve attainment
80%
reduce teacher workload
45%
CompanyHQ Location: Austria
Founded: 2017
Age Range5-7, 8-10, 11-13, 14-16
FeaturesStemCodingRoboticsDigital LiteracyCross-disciplinary EngineeringTechnologyProgrammingScratchScience
LanguagesEnglish, German
PoliciesTerms of ServicePrivacy PolicyGDPR
RequirementsAvailable OfflineDesktop - MacDesktop - WindowsDesktop - ChromebookMobile - iPhoneMobile - iPadMobile - WindowsMobile - Android
TrainingIn PersonLive OnlineWebinarsDocumentationVideos
SupportEmailFAQs/ForumKnowledge Base
Home LearningParent Access

Anyone can create the account.

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Robo Wunderkind Pricing


Pricing Plans

Free TrialOne-Off Fee

Robo Wunderkind pricing starts from £179 / one-off
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Robo Wunderkind Reviews

4.9 out of 5

from 5 Verified Reviews

Robo Wunderkind has collected 0 reviews in the past 6 months

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Robo Wunderkind
Nicola

Tutor & trainer

Educational technology consultant, England

Used Robo Wunderkind monthly for 1-2 years

Jul 2021

It’s very attractive and engaging for students. It has a low entry but unlimited potential. For KS1 &KS2 it’s a great product to enhance Computing and Science lessons.

Nicola found Robo Wunderkind:
  • Slightly reduces teacher workload
    Teaching ideas on the website.
  • Significantly increases student collaboration
    Students can work together to create a solution using Robo Wunderkind.
  • Slightly improves teacher knowledge
    Real life uses of STEM
  • Moderately improves attainment
    It’s very engaging
  • Moderately builds student knowledge
    Creating and debugging algorithms
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Robo Wunderkind
Ben

KS2 Teacher

Used Robo Wunderkind for 7–12 months

Jun 2021

An excellent tool for learning and creative thinking, which is simple to use and can be deployed effectively across all of primary school.

Ben found Robo Wunderkind:
  • Moderately builds student knowledge
    Children are able to apply what they have learned in coding lessons, as well as think creatively about how to build and design their robots.
  • Moderately improves attainment
    Robo Wunderkind made it clearer for children who interacted with it who was confident and who was less confident in coding.
  • Moderately improves teacher knowledge and skills
    Simple and easy enough to follow, with good resources and support available where needed.
  • Significantly increases student collaboration
    There have been several instances of children working excellently in teams to design, code and debug their robots!
  • Slightly reduces teacher workload
    The assessment resources look good, but my personal preference is to have everything recorded digitally; a spreadsheet version of the assessment resources would be very beneficial.
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Simone

Y6 Teacher and Computing Subject Lead

Used Robo Wunderkind for 4-6 months

Jun 2021

The children LOVE it - it allows progression from live control to code to block code (scratch is widely used in the school) meaning that the kits can serve a wide variety of year groups. The robust design is perfect for schools too. The computational thinking that the children go through whilst they think they are playing is simply the BEST part.

Simone found Robo Wunderkind:
  • Moderately builds student knowledge
    We are using the kits to demonstrate what we have learned in PSHE (Y6 transition to secondary) and History (our Topic is Total War). The children have had to come up with an idea that summarises or condenses or encapsulates a fact/event/process by coding their robots to perform a few significant tasks that represent their idea - we workshoped building, then controlling (using live) then coding (using code) the children we simply pointed at outcomes and have to find a way to make their robot respond. They worked in pairs to design and write the probable code and have also helped other pairs to problem solve if they can't get Robo to do what they want it to do.
  • Moderately improves attainment
    The pairs are of mixed ability so the children can work to their strengths, but I find because of the practicality of the device and instant checking and feedback it provides, tinkering, debugging and collaborating happens naturally.
  • Significantly improves teacher knowledge and skills
    I have had to think of ways to share what I have learned by playing around with Robo myself and the children’s solutions to problems have also given me insight to what works well for them. They often need help with abstraction and refining their code, so having a discussion about what they want the device to do versus how they are going about making that happen, gives me a chance to immediately assess their understanding, which leads to better planning for the next session. Sharing our frustrations and solutions with each other also creates a nice, no risk, collaborative classroom atmosphere
  • Significantly increases student collaboration
    Paired work, whole class demonstration of their work and trying to solve each others Robo tasks is integral to the lesson.
  • Slightly reduces teacher workload
    Well only having 4 kits in the classroom can require some very careful planning and organisation - the children who have a good idea of their code, who help others and are prepared for the lesson get to "play" with Robo, whilst the other work on their planning or need to keep busy with another task (art in my case). Also the practicality of charging the devices and ensuring the software is up to date takes commitment. A charging station could help.
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Anne

headteacher

croft primary, England

Used Robo Wunderkind for 7–12 months

Jun 2021

Excellent resource - thank you

Anne found Robo Wunderkind:
  • Significantly builds student knowledge
    coding, speaking and listening
  • Significantly improves attainment
    computing
  • Significantly improves teacher knowledge and skills
    confidence and knowledge in computing
  • Significantly increases student collaboration
    group work, working together
  • Slightly reduces teacher workload
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Nicola

Class Teacher

Used Robo Wunderkind for 1-2 years

Jun 2021

The kit is robust and motivating and provides the opportunity to learn to control devices from an easy entry (Robo Live) to the complex Blocky area of the app. This product could provide learning for a large range of ages and abilities.

Nicola found Robo Wunderkind:
  • Significantly builds student knowledge
    Colour recognition, mathematical knowledge - direction; measure; number; speed... The chance to expand and practise this knowledge greatly impacts on the social communication of my SEN pupils.
  • Moderately improves attainment
    Our school measures increase of social communication and emotional regulation and the kit provides the opportunity to learn to negotiate and take turns as well as problem solve together.
  • Significantly improves teacher knowledge and skills
    I have ensured that I am able to understand the code examples before delivering projects to my pupils. This kit provides opportunity for high level control of the Robo through a range of coding applications.
  • Significantly increases student collaboration
    We do not have a large range of kits and the product is highly motivating so pupils are happy to share and work together.
  • Does not significantly reduce teacher workload
    My pupils are SEN pupils are require projects to be modelled and supported throughout to be able to complete more complex applications.
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Pedagogy

Certified Pedagogical Quality

Certified by Education Alliance Finland, 06/2019

EAF Evaluation is an academically-backed approach to evaluating the pedagogical design of a product. EAF evaluators assess the product using criteria that covers the most essential pedagogical aspects in the learning experience.
Passive
Active
The student can actively explore the affordances of the robot. Robo Wunderkind provides structured lesson plans and materials, however the user doesn't have to follow pre-set steps and can easily go straight to more demanding tasks. The teacher materials and the student journal are very comprehensive and straightforward to use. Example robots are provided on every task, so the user can follow easy steps to get the idea of the parts that are needed for the tasks.
Rehearse
Construct
The materials provided with the kit (teacher slides and student journal) are well based on the idea of gathering information and learning skills through scaffolding: They are starting from the basics and focus on what has been learned, making sure the new information is clearly pointed out at every step. There’s plenty of reflection of learning, and the learning happens by through creative tasks, using a story as a framework for the task in hand.
Linear
Non-linear/Creative
When used with the curriculum materials, the solution provides accurately predictable learning outcomes: each lesson is planned with a clear aim or a pre-set outcome. More creative solutions are possible, and the solution promotes free exploration of the robots. Many of the tasks also require the child to think creatively, for example think what concepts like “State” or “Parallel actions” would mean in real life.
Individual
Collaborative
Robo Wunderkind can be used both individually and in groups. When used in collaboration with other learners it provides multiple possibilities for a shared learning experience. When working in a classroom environment, modular building and visual programming create an excellent base for good group learning activities.

Learning goals

Certified by Education Alliance Finland

The supported learning goals are identified by mapping the product against the selected reference curriculum and soft skills definitions most relevant for the 21st century.

  • Can understand and apply the fundamental principles and concepts of computer science, including abstraction, logic, algorithms and data representation.
  • Using technology as a part of explorative and creative process
  • Understanding technological system operations through making
  • Building common knowledge of technological solutions and their meaning in everyday life
  • Practising to understand visual concepts and shapes and observe their qualities
  • Learning to acquire, modify and produce information in different forms
  • Using technology as a part of explorative and creative process
  • Practicing logical reasoning to understand and interpret information in different forms
  • Practicing decision making
  • Learning to plan and organize work processes
  • Practicing to use foreign language as a communication tool
  • Learning decision-making, influencing and accountability
  • Learning to listen other people’s opinions
  • Practicing to work with others
  • Encouraging to build new information and visions
  • Learning to face respectfully people and follow the good manners
  • Practicing to notice links between subjects learned
  • Learning to combine information to find new innovations
  • Encouraging to build new information and visions
  • Learning to build information on top of previously learned
  • Practicing to notice causal connections
  • Learning to face failures and disappointments
  • Develop and apply their analytic, problem-solving, design, and computational thinking skills.
  • Understand the hardware and software components that make up computer systems.
  • Understand and apply the fundamental principles and concepts of computer science, including abstraction, logic, algorithms and data representation.
  • Design and develop modular programs that use procedures or functions.
  • Learn to analyse problems in computational terms
  • Use logical reasoning to explain how some simple algorithms work and to detect and correct errors in algorithms and programs.
  • Use sequence, selection, and repetition in programs; work with variables and various forms of input and output.
  • Design, write and debug programs that accomplish specific goals, including controlling or simulating physical systems; solve problems by decomposing them into smaller parts.
  • Recognise common uses of information technology beyond school.
  • Use technology purposefully to create, organise, store, manipulate and retrieve digital content.
  • Use logical reasoning to predict the behaviour of simple programs.
  • Create and debug simple programs.
  • Understand what algorithms are; how they are implemented as programs on digital devices; and that programs execute by following precise and unambiguous instructions.
  • Can evaluate and apply information technology, including new or unfamiliar technologies, analytically to solve problems.
  • Can analyse problems in computational terms, and have repeated practical experience of writing computer programs in order to solve such problems.
  • Practicing strategic thinking
  • Practicing to notice causal connections
  • Developing problem solving skills
  • Practicing to use imagination and to be innovative
  • Encouraging students to be innovative and express new ideas
  • Practicing creative thinking
  • Creating requirements for creative thinking
  • Learning to find the joy of learning and new challenges
  • Practicing persistent working
  • Learning to notice causal connections
  • Practising visual recognition
  • Practicing fine motor skills
  • Using technology as a part of explorative process
  • Practicing logical reasoning, algorithms and programming through making
  • Apply their understanding of computing to program, monitor and control their products.
  • Explore and use mechanisms [for example, levers, sliders, wheels and axles], in their products.
  • Generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through talking, drawing, templates, mock-ups and, where appropriate, information and communication technology.
  • Design purposeful, functional, appealing products for themselves and other users based on design criteria.
  • Critique, evaluate and test their ideas and products and the work of others.
  • Encouraging to build new information and visions
  • Learning to combine information to find new innovations
  • Encouraging to build new information and visions
  • Learning to build information on top of previously learned
  • Practicing to notice causal connections
  • Use sequence, selection, and repetition in programs; work with variables and various forms of input and output.
  • Use logical reasoning to explain how some simple algorithms work and to detect and correct errors in algorithms and programs.
  • Use logical reasoning to predict the behaviour of simple programs.
  • Apply their understanding of how to strengthen, stiffen and reinforce more complex structures.
  • Understand and use electrical systems in their products [for example, series circuits incorporating switches, bulbs, buzzers and motors].
  • Apply their understanding of computing to program, monitor and control their products.
  • Evaluate their ideas and products against their own design criteria and consider the views of others to improve their work.
  • Investigate and analyse a range of existing products.
  • Explore and use mechanisms [for example, levers, sliders, wheels and axles], in their products.
  • Explore and evaluate a range of existing products.
  • Design purposeful, functional, appealing products for themselves and other users based on design criteria.
  • Develop the creative, technical and practical expertise needed to perform everyday tasks confidently and to participate successfully in an increasingly technological world.
  • Using technology resources for problem solving
  • Practicing to take care of own and other people’s safety
  • Encouraging the growth of positive self-image
  • Practicing strategic thinking
  • Practicing to look things from different perspectives
  • Practicing to notice causal connections
  • Developing problem solving skills
  • Practicing to use imagination and to be innovative
  • Practicing to use imagination and to be innovative
  • Encouraging students to be innovative and express new ideas
  • Practicing to improvise
  • Practicing creative thinking
  • Creating requirements for creative thinking
  • Learning to find the joy of learning and new challenges
  • Practicing persistent working
  • Learning to notice causal connections
  • Practising visual recognition
  • Practicing categorization and classification
  • Practicing fine motor skills
  • Using technology as a part of explorative process
  • Practicing logical reasoning, algorithms and programming through making
  • Using technology as a part of explorative and creative process
  • Building common knowledge of technological solutions and their meaning in everyday life
  • Practising to understand visual concepts and shapes and observe their qualities
  • Using technology as a part of explorative and creative process
  • Learning to plan and organize work processes
  • Learning to use foreign language in work context

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Last updated 18th April 2024
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